Proton Therapy

Bragg curves neg

Proton therapy is established as the first choice for treating various cancers which are difficult or even impossible to treat by other methods. The physics of the Bragg depth-dose curve allows tumor-killing dose to be targeted with high accuracy, thus sparing nearby healthy tissue. The treatment is non-invasive and painless.

A dedicated particle accelerator, such as a cyclotron, synchrotron or linac accelerates protons or heavier ions like carbon nucleii to energies sufficient to penetrate the body. The ions are delivered through treatment nozzles to the patients in treatment stations using precision ion optics. A treatment nozzle controls and monitors the exact placement of the beam.

Pyramid sensors, electronics and software for critical treatment dose delivery functions are used worldwide in proton and carbon ion therapy centers. We specialize particularly in the latest pencil beam scanning ("PBS") treatment nozzles, offering both components and complete nozzle systems.

For more information go to the latest PBS Products Brochure.

Pbs nozzle system

The pencil beam scanning components shown above are some new developments for the Francis H Burr Proton Therapy Center at Massachusetts General Hospital, a world-leading center for the use and advancement of proton therapy. The equipment includes ionization chambers for real-time beam tracking, scanning magnet system, beam position monitors, low-scattering beam path and integrated signal measurement and control electronics.

The annual PTCOG conference is the premier scientific forum for developments in particle therapy. Pyramid, together with collaborators from MGH, Harvard University and industry, has presented new developments at this meeting.

PTCOG 52:
A Multipole Magnet Design for PBS
Amplifier Developments at MGH
PTCOG 53:
A Multifunction Isocenter Diagnostic for PBS
Towards a Beam QA Procedure for PBS
PTCOG 54:
A large-area high-resolution imaging detector system
An enhanced system for pencil beam characterization
PTCOG 55:
Use of a multi-layer Faraday collector
A simulator system for PBS